Turkey Tours

Urfa Castle and Mevlid-i Halil (Devish Lodge) Mosque and Cave

Urfa Castle is thought to have been built over an area from the Neolithic Age dating back 10000 years B.C.12000 year old Balikligol Statue, which was excavated near the castle and is on display in Sanliurfa museum and the castle ground portray the history of the Balikligol basin. Records dating back to 6th century do not mention the castle. The first records about the castle are from the 11th century. Considering this information, we can date it back to sometime between 6th and 11th centuries. The common knowledge about the castle is that it was built during the reign of Abbasid in 812-814 A.D. The two Corinthian pillar heads were erected as monumental pillars during Edessa Kng MANU IX 240-242 A.D. The Assyrian tablet on the east pillar reads “I’m Aftuha, the son of military commander Barshamas (Son of the Sun). I built this pillar and the statue in the name of Crown Prince Daughter of MANU, wife of King MANU, my lady and Queen Shalmeth”. There are ditches on...

Halil Ur-Rahman Mosque (Doseeme Mosque) and Madrassa

The mosque is next to Halil-ür Rahman Lake (Balikli Gol). The mosque is also called “Döşeme Mosque” by the locals. In 504 A.D. Priest Urbisyus built a church in the name of Jesus Christ’s mother Mary. Known as the Virgin Mary Church in records, the church was turned into a mosque by Abbasid caliphate Me’mun’s rule (813-833. The minaret was repaired by Saladin’ nephew Al Malik-ul Esref Muzafferuddin Musa in 1211-1212. The whole structure was renovated by Suleiman the Magnificient (1520-156). In 1810, there was another comprehensive ronavation. Evliya CElebi mentions of this mosque in his Seyehatname as “Ibrahim Halil Lodge”.  

The largest museum complex of Turkey: Sanliurfa Museum

Initiatives to set up a museum in Sanliurfa began in 1948 with the colleciton of museum pieces and storeage of the pieces in Ataturk Elemanry School. Later on, the pieces were transferred to Sehit Nusret Elementary School. The construction of the museum began in 1965 and the museum was opened for visits in 1969. The museum in the Sehitlik neighborhood could only be used until 2014 due to a higher number of artifacts. Sanliurfa Archeology Museum is moved to its new building in neighborhood of Haleplibahce in 2015. Sanliurfa Archeology Museum is the 5th richest museum in Turkey, with 74000 items. From Paleolithic Era up to present, many significant pieces can be seen in Sanliurfa Museum. “12000Year-old World’s Oldest Sculpture: Balıklıgol Sculpture” can be seen in our Museum. In terms of the number of archological excavations, Sanliurfa comes first in Turkey. In this context, the city center and two other township centers were declared as archeological sites. It...

Visit the entire Urfa in 3 days

Şanlıurfa Indepence Museum The villa is near the old State Hospital. It was built in 1903 in an architectural mixture of European and Şanlıurfa local style. The villa is spread over a large area and has two sections for men and women. In 1940s Public  Theater made performances in this building. The villa was repaired by Sanliurfa Governorship and opened as Sanliurfa Indepence Museum on April 11, 2009. A section of the villa has ben allocated for State Turkish Folk Music Choir. There is also a room designed as Muslum Gurses Music Museum in the villa. Fırfırlı Mosque The construction located on Vali Fuat Bey Street was originally built as a church and recorded  as 12 Disciples Church. In Ottoman Era, because of the wind mill wings on it, the Church was callaed “Frilly Church” by the locals. According to history records the “Lamina Cross”, which was very important for Christianity and was in the Lamina Church was later on broughjt to Urfa and displayed in this...

Şanlıurfa, TURKEY

Round structures, belonging to B.C. 10 5000, are unearthed in the excavations, which are made in Göbekli Hill around Urfa. Thus, Urfa has a history for twelwe thousand five hundred years as of now and also is also known as “City of Prophets” because prophets such as Abraham, Ayoub and Shoaib live in this city. Urfa is established on the territories, called “Fertile Crescent” in the archaeological literature because it is a region, from which culture and citizenship is spread into the world wide. Region is ruled firstly by Hurrians in B.C. 1500 and then resğectively Mitannians, Hittites, Assyrians, Urartians, Medians, Persians, Alexander the Great and Seleucians. Edessa name is used instead of Urhay/Urfa by beginning from Seleucians period. Syrians establish Osrhoene Kingdom, whose capital city is Urfa in B.C. 132. Urfa becomes colony of Roman Empire during the period of emperor Caracalla (211-217)in A.D. 216. After Roman Empire is divided into two pieces in...

9 Places in Istanbul in Turkish novels

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Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, Beykoz Grove It should be said that Tanpınar söylemek ın Five Cities ’is not a novel. However, if you are looking for a cultural book written on Istanbul, I would like to put this book on your bedside in Istanbul with four different cities. Tanpınar talks about the Beykoz grove in the Five Cities as follows: çalış Which Istanbulers did not miss a wealthy and hard-working contender who would defend himself against the scorching obligations of the outer realm as he wandered around the Beykoz choruses or the Baby Ridges, even though for a brief moment, he couldn’t remember his steel armor. it is dressed? ‘ Orhan Pamuk and Taşkışla Orhan Pamuk, the son of a noble and Istanbul-based family, has a special place in Istanbul’s life. Sometimes he looks through his window. Sometimes he goes out on the streets and traces the different faces of the city. Taşkışla about Pamuk’s novel ” Yeni Hayat ” and today used to be a faculty of...

The Ottoman Empire (AD 1290 – 1923)

The Ottomans, a turkish tribe related to the Selçuks, date their history from the reign of Osman I in the 1290s. Osman’s principality started in the region around Söğüt between Bursa and Kütahya. It abutted on the Byzantine Empire. Through the 12th and 14th centuries the Ottomans were often allies of the Byzantines. But increasingly, the weak Byzantine and Selçuk powers gave way to the vigorous, tolerant Ottomans who often were preferred by the general populace over their former rulers. Except for the interregnum (when there was a power struggle among the sultan’s surviving sons) between 1402 and 1413, until the dissolution of the empire in 1923 the Ottoman power continued without interruption. Equally impressive, the last sultan, Mehmet VI (1918-1922), was a direct descendent of Osman I: the Ottoman family had reigned for over six hundred years. One of the Ottoman practices instuted by the first sultans was the millet (religious community) system where by the major...
Demre

Demre, Myra

Demre is the village between Kaş and Finike which identifies the site of the ancient Myra. In Roman times Myra was on the sea. It was the port where Paul and his companions Luke and Aristarchus changed ships on their way to Rome in about 60 AD. St. Nicholas is supposed to have been born in Patara about 300 AD; as an adult he became the Bishop of Myra. While his name is still a familiar household word, his fame does not rest on his great theological wisdom (as did many of his contemporaries’ renown like Basil and Gregory). Rather he is known for his miracles; he continues to be loved because he cared for people in need. He is the patron saint of Greece and of Russia, and the protector of children, scholars, merchants and sailors. People fearful of being robbed when they are traveling seek his help. Little is known for certain about ST. Nicholas. He is supposed to have ben persecuted by the Emperor Diocletian and kept in prison because of his faith; later he is supposed to...

Kınık – Xanthos, The Letoon, Turkey

Kınık – Xanthos Xanthos is located dramatically high above the Xanthos River (Esen Çayı). Two of Homer’s heroes are from here, Lord Sarpedon and faultless Glaucos who came from the distant, whirling waters of Xanthos. One of the most heartrending stories of history, told by Herodotus, is of the defense of the city against attacking Persians about 540 BC. When the Lycians realized that they would lose, the men collected their wives, children, slaves and all their other possesions, locked them in the citadel, set fire to it, and then sallied forth to die every man fighting against the enemy. This gruesome story was repeated in 42 BC when Brutus attacked the city trying to get enough money to pay for his fight against the enemy. This gruesome story was repeated in 42 BC when Brutus attacked the city trying to get enough money to pay for his fight against Mark Anthony and Octavian. But the present power and romance of Xanthos are largely in its monuments, almost all of...

Yuşa Tepesi, – Giant’s Hill, Anadolu Kavağı – Genoese Castle

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Two places of interest because of their long history as religious sites are near the northern end of the Bosphorus on the Asiatic side. Yuşa Tepesi, a grave and a mosque high on a hill north of Beykoz, is a place of pilgrimage for Muslims who count it holy and believe that the water from the well in front of the mosque has healing powers. The huge grave (about 18 m long) is reputed to belong to Yuşa, or Joseph, Dede; earlier it was called “the Bed of Hercules.” Justinian built the Church of St. Pantaleimon here on top of a pre-Christian Temple to Jupiter. The grave itself is thought to date back to the Neolithic Period. A bit farther north is the fishing village of Anadolu Kavağı, a good place for a seafood meal. The Genoese Castle on the hill is the place in legend where Jason built a Temple to Zeus Ourious (Zeus of the Favorable Winds) for helping him find the Golden Fleece. The base of that temple is in the British Museum. The Temple to Zeus was one of twelwe here,...

Sığacık, Teos, Places to visit in Turkey

Teos is on the Aegean Sea southwest of İzmir; its Temple to Dionysus was important in pagan times. It is little but fields of grains and lentils interspersed with marble columns. The slope that rises gently from the sea, the green trees and fieldsi the view of offshore islands make Teos one of the most attractive of the ancient sites on the Aegean. It was supposed to have been founded before the 10th century BC and to have prospered early in its history. Two literary men came from Teos, the 6th century BC poet Anacreon and the 1st century BC bibliophile Apellikon. Anacreon and the 1st century BC bibliophile Apellikon. Anacreon is known for his lyrics celebrating old age, love, spring, and wine and song. Apellikon bought Aristotle’s library and tried to save the pages that had suffered from being stored in a damp place. Unfortunately, mistakes were made as they were copied, and, likewise unfortunately, much of it was later lost in Egypt. Teos came into fame as an...

İzmir – Smryna, Beautiful places to visit in Turkey

İzmir is the third largest city in Turkey and the main center for exports. It was the site of the second church scolded by John in Revelation, and the home of the martyred Polycarp. A number of synagogues, and the home of the martred Polycarp. A number of synagouges function as places of worship for the Jewish community. Tourists who stay here find it a useful center from which to explore to whole Aegean region. In addition, there is much to see in İzmir itself. The history first. A port on the deep İzmir bay, many of its residents have probably always been merchants. The first settlers residents have probably always been merchants. The first settlers about 2000 BC seem to have lived in the Bayraklı region on the northwest side of the bay. There may have been some Hittie influence at that time. According Ekrem Akurgal, the archaeologist who has directed these excavations, the site was a small peninsula that juttet out into the bay. A well-built 7th century BC temple to Athena was...

Geyre – Aphrodisias, Ancient cities in the Aegean

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Aphrodisias is well of the main highway between İzmir and Denizli, about 35 km from the turn near Kuyucuk. It is in the pretty valley of a small tributary of the Menderes River near the town of Geyre which used to be located on top of it. Temples, a bishop’s palace, a theater, a huge stadium, baths, a council chamber and, above all of these spectacular finds, a great quantity of beautiful statuary distinguish Aphrodisias as one of the most attractive ancient cities in Anatolia. The earliest finds go back to about 5800 BC. During the Roman Period there was a major school of sculptuors at Aphrodisias producing masterpieces of white and blue-gray marble that were sent throught the Roman world. The artist’s workshop with their unfinished sculptures has been uncovered and some of their work put on display. Aphrodite, the city’s patron goddess who symbolized fertility in the Greek and Roman Periods, was related through the city’s first known Akkadian name, Ninoe,...

Dinar – Apemeia Ancient City

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Dinar is located on the main road from Izmir to Konya. It is also at the crossroads of that road and the north-south road from Antalya to Afyon, Kütahya and Eskişehir. Ancient Dinar was Celaenae where Xerxes the Great had a palace. Xenephon reported that Cyrus the Younger under whom he served filled the palace grounds with wild animals. (In those years lions and tigers commonly roamed Anatolia.) Renamed Apamea, according to Strabo it was one of the important commercial centers in the 4th century BC. Business here was under the control of the Italians and the Jews. One of the beliefs of the resident Jews was that he highest mountain behind the city was Mt. Araray. Philip of Macedon used that tradition by adding the mountain to the coins he struck after he included Apamea in his conquests. Dinar now is an agricultural town; it suffered from a serious earthquake in the fall of 1995.

Honaz – Colossae

Colossae lies about a mile below the present village of Honaz on the north slope of Honaz Dağı and about 18 km east of Denizli. Of the sites described in this book it is one of the least rewarding to a casual tourist, but a walk from Honaz to it might give a hint of rural Anatolia as Paul experienced it. Its places in Christian history is because of a 1st century AD letter addressed to it that was included in the New Testament. In the 5th century BC Colossae was a major commercial center on the trade route from Sardis to Konya. It lost its importance bythe 1st century BC when Laodicea was founded. It, along with Laodicea and Hierapolis, was destroyed in the earthquake of AD 60. The cities of the area declined in the 7th and 8th centuries AD under the pressure of Arab invaders. Later the Byzantines and Selçuks fought over it. The remains of a theater are still discernible, along with a few other buildings; bu the site has not been excavated and is rarely visited. Colossae was...

Laodikya – Laodicea, Turkey

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The site of another of the seven churches addressed by John in the Book of Revelation, Laodicea is on a low hill between Denizli and Pamukkale and on the south bank of the Lycus River (Çürüksu). Ruins of theaters, a gymnasium, a stadium,, and several other public buildings stand up above the wheat fields or the weeds, depending on the season. The city was intersected by main trading routes running east-west and north-south. As a commercial center, it had a large Jewish community. When Hadrian visited it in AD 129 it was at its height and called itself “the metropolis of Asia.” Strabo, the 1st century geographer, reported that Laodicea was known for the unusually soft black wool from its shep. For John in Revelation, the Christians of Laodicea were neither hot nor cold and because of their indifference he wanted to spew them out of his mouth. This refence has made scholoars wonder if John was thinking about the hot springs of Pamukkale only 7km farther away. His...

Sart Köy – Sardis, Turkey Travel

The partially restored synagogue and the ruins of temples and churches mark the importance of Sardis as a religious site. Beginning in the 6th century BC Sardis was the terminus of the main east-west Royal Road. As the capital of Lydia it was the commercial center of the western Mediterranean well into 1st century BC. On the main highway east from İzmir, now surrounded with rich farm land, Sardis owed much of its power to the gold that its kings took from the Pactolus (Sart çayı) stream that comes down out of Mt. Tmolus (Bozdağ). The Lydian empire included almost all of western Anatolia. The history of Sardis is told with many anecdotes by Herodotus. One of its first kings, Gyges was forced by the queen to kill his predecessor and mary her. Gyges carried on diplomatic relations with the Assyrian Emperor Assurbanipal (669-627 BC) This occurred during the time that Judah was a vassal state of Assyria and its merchants were busy throught the Empire. Thus while there are no references...

Manisa – Magnesia – Sypilus

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A natural forck formation on the southwest edge of the city of Manisa is identified with the legend of Niobe, the mother who must weep for all eternity because Apollo and Artemis killed her twelwe children. The profile of her face can be imagined from the road, but from close up her features become only large, rough stones. Two stone reliefs in the Manisa area are Hittite work, evidence of their infuence on the Aegean coast. One, the Taş Suret, probably the seated Mother Goddess, was incorrectly identified with the Niobe legend for a long time. It is on the eastern edge of city on the road to Turgutlu. The second relief is at the Karabel pass where a stone warrior defends the road. Perhaps a similar soldier was once stationed on the other side of the road. The old name of Manisa was Magnesiad-Sipylus. The high iron contect of the stone of Mt. Sipylus (Manisa Dağı) which rises above Manisa makes it magnetic. This property was common knowledge to the Greeks and Romans who called it...

Akhisar – Thyatira

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Located on the main road between İzmir and Bursa, Akhisar is a modern city with little of historical or archaeological interest visible to tourists today. It appears in guide books mainly because it is the old Thyatira, the site of one of the Seven Churches of Asia. The ancient ruins you can see are a short section of a colonnaded street, a temple (perhaps to Apollo), and walls of a church. They are enclosed within an area of a small city block in the Middle of Akhisar. John’s criticism of Thyatira in Revelation was related to the prophetess Jezebel. Whether she was a real woman of that name or whether he intented her as a symbol of licentiousness, John saw the challenge to Christianity which Thyatira represented as a moral decay among the members. To those who refused to compromise with their ideals he promised “the star of dawn” and “authority over the nations.” About forty years previous to the time that John wrote those words to the congregation...

Bergama – Pergamum

Pergamum‘s religious interests lie in its pagan temples, in its place as the site of one of the Seven Churches, and in its role in the history of western Asia Minor. From its acropolis its kings controlled a major crossroads in the 3rd century BC. Its kings eventually ruled Aeolia, Ionia, the Troad, Phyrygia and Caria. They showed their power both as successful generals and as patrons of the arts. Under them the city accumulated one of the largest libraries in the ancient world. It was so extensive that jealous Alexandria, which had the monopoly, tried to curtail the number of volumes in its library by putting an embargo on the export of papyrus. The king was unwilling to give up his interest, so he resorted to having his books copied on skin. Skins do not roll up the way papyrus. The king was unwilling to give up his interest, so he resorted to having his books copied on skin. Skins do not roll up the way papyrus does, but they do make pages that can be used on both sides,...

Boğazkale – Hattutas, Central Turkey

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Boğazkale (the current name) means the citadel at the pass. It is and accurate description of the situation of Hattutas, the stronghold-capital of the Hittite Empire from about 1750 to 1100 BC. Located about 150 km east of Ankara, Hattussas was probably chosen for its strategic location on easily defended hill in the center of the empire. I sits between two rivers and near the crossroads of two ancient trade routes. The Hittites were an Indo – European people whose kingdom at its height included much of Lebanon, northern Syria, east to the Euphrates, west possibly as far as the Aegean Sea and north to the southern slopes of the mountains that edge the Black sea. They challenged Egypt and Assyria for control of central Syria. They may have participated in the Trojan War. There are biblical references to them: Ezekiel calls the mother of Jerusalem a Hittite; that may or may not be a metaphor. Heth, one of Canaan’s sons in the Table of Nations is te presumed ancestor of...

Istanbul Daily Photo Tours

How much time do you have? How much do you want to see Istanbul. Let us set your sights together Please choose comfortable shoes. we will walk. Know Istanbul from the heart 25 year old guide from Istanbul He is expert No person limit Just contact us and ask for price.. Start: Sultanahmet – Hippodrome Walk to Beyazit, Suleymaniye, Şehzadebaşı Camii, Zeyrek Camii, Fener and balat And after going to taksim Walk Istiklal Street Tunnel, Galata Tower, Karakoy and Eminonu Do you think Istanbul boat tour?

Central Turkey – The past and the present of the art and religion of Asia Minor can be found here.

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The heartland of the modern Turkish Republic is the high central plateau. Around the Capital of Ankara are the Fairy Chimneys of Göreme, the Whirling Dervish museum in Konya, the Stone Age city of Çatalhöyük, and Yalvaç where St. Paul preached his first sermon. Boğazkala (Hattussas) Yazılıkaya Alaca Höyük Hacıbektaş (Morimene) Kayseri (Caesarea) Kültepe(Kanesh) Hierapolis (Comana) Cappadocian Churches: Göreme, Çavuşin, Soğanlı Derinkuyu, Kaymaklı Sivas (Sebaste) Tokat (Comana Pontica) Amasya (Amaseia) Yassıhöyük (Gordium) Ballıhisar (Pessinus) Midas Şehri Çavdarhisar (Aizanoi) Konya (Iconium) Çatalhöyük Yalvaç (Antioch-of-Pisidia) Akşehir (Philomelium)  
Myra

Turkey Mediterranean Ancient Cities

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Knidos – Cnidus The histroy of Cnidus parallels that of many of the coastal cities. Only a landfall for Paul, it is the Temple to Aphrodite that identifies the religious importance of the site. After the Persians had defeated the Lydian kingdom in 546 BC, they turned south to Caria. Threatened by the Persians in 546 BC, the Cnidians started to carve a canal to isolate themselves from the mainland. The Persian army arrived before their work was done, so they were forced to submit to Persian rule off and on until the time of Alexander the Great. By about 360 BC they had moved their city from present-day Datça to the tip of the peninsula. Although Cnidus is best reached by boat from Marmaris or Bodrum, the sea around it has always had a reputation for being treacherous when the nortwest wind blows, and many boats have sunk in these waters. Cnidians built a causeway between the mainland and the small adjacent island almost as soon as they moved here. This gave them a double...

Istanbul Day Trips

Exploring Istsanbul Ironically, Istanbul’s Asian side is filled with sprawling, Western-style suburbs, and its European side is a maze of mosques, opulent palaces, and crowded Oriental bazaars. The five tours below fouc on the European side, making occasional forays across the water. Tour I – Half Day Afternoon Tour  Ottoman Heritage (with Entrance Ticket Included) Topkapi Palace: Topkapi Palace was the main residence of the sultan and his court. It was initially the seat of government as well as the imperial residence. Even though access was strictly regulated, inhabitans of the palace rarely had to venture out since the palace functioned almost as an autonomous entity, a city within a city. Audince and consultation chmabers and areas served for the political workings of the empire. Little Hagia Sophia Musum: Little Hagia Sophia (Küçük Ayasofya Camii), formerly the Church of the Saints Sergius and Bacchus, is a former Eastern Orthodox church dedicated to Saints...

New Event in İstanbul: Post-Impressionist selection from Arkas Collection

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The exhibition of 48 artists and 102 works from various countries of Europe can be visited from September 13th to November 6th at Tophane-i Amire Culture and Art Center Five Dome Hall. Adress: https://goo.gl/maps/zsroSm4gMeS2

Exciting Antique Buildings waiting for visitors on the Lycian Way

There are as many beauty as the breathtaking scenery from the ancient cities that will excite you on the Lycian Way starting from Fethiye and extending 500 miles to Antalya. After passing Oludeniz the road coincides with an ancient road for about 3.5 km. between the waist and the hunter passes through the ancient city of Sidyma then turn north from letoon to xanthos PATARA The road that continues from the northern part of Kalkan passes through the towns of Phellos and Antiphellos in the direction of Kas and reaches the beach. When it is continued from the beach, kaletepe, Apollonia when it enters the road again, ancient cities of Aperlai when apollonia is descended again. an Aperlai is great. It is then continued along the coast from the fortress of Kaleüçağız, Theiimiussa and Simena, and many small ruins are visible (ancient settlement of caldera, ancient settlement of gökkaya, istland) From the coast of Sourau and from the north of Andriake, the ancient city of Myra is reached...